Friday, February 01, 2019

Pre-dawn Visits by Officer Friendly and Friends



RobertMueller is Bullwinkle
Or the predawn raid on Roger Stone.

It was straight out of a poorly shot, badly lighted B-grade espionage movie starring Tom Cruise, except that the “star” was Roger Stone.

29 heavily armed FBI agents, a hovering, armed helicopter, frogmen in an amphibious assault boat in the canal behind his house, an armored troop carrier, a battering ram, and police vehicles with flashing lights, appeared on January 31st at Roger Stone’s Fort Lauderdale, Florida, residence to arrest Roger Stone on orders from Robert Mueller,  via Christopher Wray, director of the FBI.

As I have remarked elsewhere on various reports of the raid, the FBI came loaded for bear, as though they were expecting a fierce counter attack by Sitting Bull or Geronimo with ten thousand Indians ready to put up a furious fight and descend en masse on the hapless agents with war clubs, tomahawks, and scalping knives.

Or, rather, instead, they were there to  arrest El Chapo’s twin brother, or another Mexican drug kingpin with massive firepower to resist arrest.

The manpower employed to arrest an unarmed 66-year-old man was ludicrous and would be comic if it weren’t a harbinger of the police state tactics employed by Mueller, tactics used to capture and kill Osama Bin Laden. Many commentators state that the force used by the FBI in the Stone raid is a “take no risks” standard when agents are assigned to arrest a particularly dangerous or pawn-rich person, such as Roger Stone.

After all, Stone is a closet Nazi, the MSM want to believe, and he and Trump daily practice John Cleese’s mockery of Nazis on Fawlty Towers.

But the FBI – and Mueller – must have known in advance Stone’s age and the fact that he owned no weapon of any kind.

Why was it important to “grand stand” Stone’s “capture” and arrest? Judge Andrew P. Napolitano explains why in his column in the Jewish World Review:

Stone has been both a paid formal adviser and an unpaid informal adviser to Trump for 40 years. He was fired from Trump's presidential campaign during the summer of 2015, but he continued to work on his own to help Trump defeat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. Some of that help — according to the government — involved the release of embarrassing Clinton emails that had probably been hacked by Russian agents.

Last Thursday, one of special counsel Robert Mueller's grand juries indicted Stone on five counts of lying to Congress, one count of witness intimidation and one count of obstruction of justice. His Gestapo-like arrest followed his indictment by just a few hours.

Stone was represented by counsel throughout the time of his testimony before Congress last year. He was the recipient of grand jury subpoenas for his text messages, his emails and other records — all of which, through his counsel, he surrendered. He claims that when asked by members of the House Intelligence Committee about certain aspects of these, he innocently forgot about them. Who could remember each of 1 million texts and emails?

In the real world — where the influence of politics into law enforcement is kept to a harmless minimum — defense counsel is generally known to prosecutors throughout their investigation of a target. According to Stone, federal prosecutors have known for a year who his lawyers are. Also in the real world, when a defendant has been indicted for a nonviolent crime, has no criminal record and is not a flight risk or an imminent danger to society, prosecutors inform defense counsel of the indictment, send the defense counsel a copy of it and request the peaceful and dignified surrender of the indicted person.

In the current, unreal world — where politics deeply infuse law enforcement — prosecutors use brute force to send a message of terror to innocent defendants. Like all defendants at the time of arrest, Stone is innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

But what crime is he guilty or innocent of beyond a reasonable doubt?

What message does brute force send? It is a message of terror, and it has no place in American life. As if to add embarrassment to terror, the feds may have tipped off CNN, which carried all this live in real time.

And the message of terror in this instance is dictated by Robert Mueller, in connivance with Christopher Wray. The recording of the arrest is owned by CNN, who just happened to be at the arrest scene, because CNN’s “gut” told it that something was going to happen at Stone’s residence. The “gut” has a name: Mueller and the FBI, who wanted a visual record that the FBI was obeying orders to humiliate Stone and warn others that this is what in store for anyone who defies Robert Mueller.

As sly and calculating as Trump?
Stone said to Laura Ingraham on her show:

"The truth of the matter is, if you read my book, "Stone’s Rules," I believe when you're falsely accused of something, and you say nothing, you say no comment, or Roger Stone was unavailable, most Americans assume you are guilty."

"The whole purpose of this over-the-top raid on my house, in which they sent in more men than were used to protect our compound in Benghazi, was to paint a picture of me coming to poison a jury pool as public enemy number one," Stone said.

The point here, is that Stone likely set up Mueller, not vice versa. He waited for Mueller to trigger his razzle-dazzle mouse trap to “trap” him. And Mueller will get nothing, because Stone will not rat on Trump, nor invent cheese for Mueller to nibble on. And the special investigator will add another zero to his growing list of zeroes, except for all the indicted victims who had nothing to do with Russian collusion.